National Grocer

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Hurricane Resources for Grocers Impacted by Hurricane Florence

Sep 12, 2018

Hurricane Florence is on track to be one of the strongest storms on the Eastern Seaboard in decades. "This will likely be the storm of a lifetime for portions of the Carolina coast, and that's saying a lot given the impacts we've seen from Hurricanes Diana, Hugo, Fran, Bonnie, Floyd and Matthew," the National Weather Service in Wilmington, North Carolina, said late Tuesday.

To help independent grocers prepare their stores, associates and communities below are some helpful resources available. We will be updating this page with additional information and resources from state and federal government agencies and other organizations responding to the storm.


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FEMA

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will be managing a page for up-to-date information on Hurricane Florence, which can be found at https://www.fema.gov/hurricane-florence. Included on that page are preparedness tips found below. 

Be prepared for disruption for an extended amount of time:

  • Power and phone service outages
  • Roads blocked by flood and/or debris
  • Water and sewer outages

Remember:

  • Restock your emergency preparedness kit with food and water
  • Refill your gas tank and stock your vehicle with emergency supplies and a change of clothes
  • Bring patio furniture and garbage cans inside; they could become dangerous in high winds
  • Have cash on hand.
  • Turn on your TV/radio, or check your city/county website every 30 minutes to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions
  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Do not drive around barricades, or through high water. Remember, if you encounter flooded roadways, turn around, don’t drown!
  • Know how you’ll communicate with family members once the storm passes. You can call, text, email or use social media. During disasters, text instead of calling because phone lines are often overloaded

Additional Information