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NGA President & CEO: Tax Reform Must be Comprehensive, Corporate Only Reform is a Non-Starter

Jul 30, 2013

Arlington, VA: Today, President Obama released a proposal that attempts to simplify the tax code for American businesses by reforming only corporate tax rates. Though efforts to lower the top corporate tax rate from the highest in the world at 35 percent to 28 percent is a step in the right direction, the National Grocers Association (NGA) is disappointed that the President's proposal did not include relief for Main Street America, particularly businesses operating as pass-through entities, such as S-Corps and LLC's, which are taxed at the individual rate.

Nearly half of NGA members operate as pass-through entities and experienced a tax increase from 35 percent to 39.6 percent in a last minute deal to avert the fiscal cliff back in January. As it is, businesses filing taxes individually are already paying higher rates than C-Corps.

"NGA supports the efforts of Chairmen Camp and Baucus to enact tax reform that is comprehensive. NGA has long said that tax reform must be balanced, fair, equitable, and provide lower rates for both C-Corps and pass-throughs so grocers can continue their commitment to serve their consumers, communities, and employees as they do every day. Simply put, tax reform that does not provide relief for pass-through entities is a non-starter," said Peter J. Larkin, President & CEO, NGA. "NGA looks forward to continuing to work with Congress to enact meaningful comprehensive reform that enables independent grocers to grow their businesses and create jobs".

In March 2013, NGA released a report titled Principles of Tax Reform for the Independent Grocer which outlines tax principles important to independent grocers. The report can be viewed at www.nationalgrocers.org/taxreport.

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